Announcing the 2022 StateScoop 50 Awards winners

Scoop News Group is thrilled to announce the winners of the 2022 StateScoop 50 Awards.

The awards, now in their ninth year, honor the most influential people in the state government community and the most innovative projects that advance services and solutions for residents. 

The 2022 edition of the awards were presented at a reception in conjunction with the National Association of State Chief Information Officers’ midyear conference in National Harbor, Maryland, sponsored by Appian, Salesforce, Spectrum Enterprise and Zoom.

In January, members of the state and local IT community nominated more than 1,000 leaders and projects for the awards. StateScoop narrowed the list to nearly 180 finalists, and readers cast more than 3.5 million votes to select this year’s winners.

“This year marks the ninth StateScoop 50 Awards, and my team and I remain thankful for the incredible work done by the state IT community in these challenging times,” said Jake Williams, the vice president of content and community of StateScoop and EdScoop. “The winners of the 2022 StateScoop 50 Awards are truly exceptional leaders and include innovative projects that are setting the stage for even more transformation in government.”

This year’s winners represent 23 states and 13 private-sector companies. Winners include one governor, numerous C-level information technology leaders and noteworthy projects from across the country. 

The winners:

TwitterFacebookLinkedInRedditGmail

Jonathan Askins

Jonathan Askins

GoldenGov: State Executive of the Year

Jonathan Askins had never worked in government before December 2020, when Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson hired him as CTO. Since then, Askins has overseen a centralization of state-government networks, an effort he says was long-discussed but never completed. “That’s been something that’s been talked about for years, but over the last 12 to 13 months we’ve seen some really fantastic process,” he says. He’s also been focused on repurposing the state Division of Information Systems as a more business-minded organization. “Everything we do here is customer-focused, whether it’s a department or ultimately the citizens of Arkansas,” he says.

TwitterFacebookLinkedInRedditGmail

Tracy Barnes

Tracy Barnes

GoldenGov: State Executive of the Year

In April 2021, Indiana Gov. Eric Holcomb signed legislation giving the Indiana Office of Technology greater responsibilities and authorities in helping state agencies and local governments deal with cyberattacks. In the year since, CIO Tracy Barnes has been on something of a roadshow, with he and his team visiting more than 40 of the state’s 92 counties so far as he builds up a whole-of-state cybersecurity strategy. “The legislation created some awareness. But what we did in conjunction is what created the relationships,” says Barnes, who has plans to visit the remaining counties by the end of the year. “It’s putting us in a stronger position as a state overall.”

TwitterFacebookLinkedInRedditGmail

Matthew Behrens

Matthew Behrens

GoldenGov: State Executive of the Year

As interim CIO of Iowa, Matthew Behrens heads an organization striving to improve technology both inside government and across the state. Iowa is expanding its cybersecurity operations center to support local governments, while also spending $350 million on broadband to improve connectivity to more than 110,000 homes, schools and businesses, he says. “We feel like we’re making important progress toward ultimately ensuring that all Iowans have access to fast and reliable internet service, which opens so many doors, whether it’s learning online, working remotely, starting a business or receiving health care from a remote provider,” Behrens says.

TwitterFacebookLinkedInRedditGmail

DeAngela Burns-Wallace

DeAngela Burns-Wallace

GoldenGov: State Executive of the Year

As Kansas’ chief information technology officer, DeAngela Burns-Wallace has overseen a sea change in how agencies share cybersecurity intelligence. “Collaboration is vital to addressing cybersecurity, and we spent the last year building relationships in the public and private sectors across Kansas to identify how and where we can work together,” Burns-Wallace says. She’s also led creation of a new IT framework that keeps state agencies on the same page. “As we talk with agencies to forecast the support and IT services they’ll need, the objectives and goals of the framework will help guide those conversations,” she says.

TwitterFacebookLinkedInRedditGmail

Laura Clark

Laura Clark

GoldenGov: State Executive of the Year

A 15-year veteran of Michigan government IT, Laura Clark pulls double duty as the state’s chief security officer and — as of last October — statewide CIO. “It’s been an interesting transition,” she says, but one that’s allowed her to look at Michigan’s internal processes and find opportunities modernize legacy systems and support a workforce that’s transitioning from the pandemic into a hybrid-work organization. She’s also got a growing focus on human-centered design for internal- and external-facing applications, especially as Michigan’s single sign-on portal grows. “Our residents no longer want to go agency to agency. They want to go through the portal and complete multiple interactions and they don’t care what agency they’re getting it from,” she says.

TwitterFacebookLinkedInRedditGmail

Amanda Crawford

Amanda Crawford

GoldenGov: State Executive of the Year

“It’s definitely been quite a year,” Texas CIO Amanda Crawford says of her agency’s efforts to implement all the measures of a wide-ranging data and cybersecurity law Gov. Greg Abbott signed last summer. That’s included naming data officers at every executive-branch agency, launching the TexRAMP cloud vendor certification program — which aims to do for the state what FedRAMP does for the U.S. government — and, most recently, planning the first of a series of regional security operation centers at Angelo State University, which will help protect West Texas communities from cyber threats. But Crawford says the 220-employee Department of Information Resources has been able to handle the added duties: “We’re small but mighty.”

TwitterFacebookLinkedInRedditGmail

TwitterFacebookLinkedInRedditGmail